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A No-kill, Non Profit Animal Shelter Based in Montreal

Surrendering

Please read the following information BEFORE contacting us! Please choose your situation:
  1. You have found a friendly CAT/KITTEN that appears to be homeless.
  2. You have found a friendly DOG/PUPPY that appears to be homeless.
  3. You have FERAL CAT POPULATION you know of or have been feeding and would like to know what to do.
  4. You have a found an animal that appears to be HURT OR SICK

You have found a friendly cat/kitten that appears to be homeless

  • Eleven Eleven cannot place your found animal until these steps have been taken:
  • Make a report of the cats description at the SPCA and your local municipal pound
  • Post flyers around the neighbourhood of the cat you have found
  • Make posts online or sites like Craigs List, and Kijiji. Be careful to only note enough information for the potential owner to know it is his animals, and leave some to yourself to be able to know if it is the actually owner. Keep details like sex, specific markings (Spot on nose), sterilization status, ect to determine if it is the actual owner. If you have potential adopters interested screen carefully, placing animals via the internet on sites like these can be dangerous.
  • Wait a minimum of 7 days before placing the animal for adoption.
  • Once this has been completed you can then send us an email with the animals description then we will see if we are able to find a foster home to be able to take the animal in to the rescue. Please include in your email the potential age, sex, breeds, temperament, size and anything else that may be relevant.
      • Take precautions when bringing a new animal into the household:
        • All other animals should have no contact with the new arrival. Your other cats are at serious risk of contracting many potential diseases or parasites from the new addition. Many disease are able to be spread by air or indirect contact, wash your hands throughly between animals and even change clothes.
        • Ideally you should bring the new arrival to the veterinary office as soon as possible. The following is recommend with cats comming from outside; Feline Immunodeficiency test for FIV and FeLV, Flea treatment and prevention, De-worming, along with vaccines and sterilization. You can ask the veterinary to sex the animal, in females they can look for a scar to see if she may be spayed and males for the presence of testicles.
        • New arrivals should be quarantined for a minimum of 14 days before introducing to the house hold.

You have found a friendly dog/puppy that appears to be homeless

      • Eleven Eleven can not place your found animal until these steps have been taken:
        • Make a report of the cats description at the SPCA and your local municipal pound
        • Post flyers around the neighbourhood of the cat you have found
        • Make posts online or sites like Craigs List, and Kijiji. Be careful to only note enough information for the potential owner to know it is his animals, and leave some to yourself to be able to know if it is the actually owner. Keep details like sex, specific markings (Spot on nose), sterilization status, ect to determine if it is the actual owner. If you have potential adopters interested screen carefully, placing animals via the internet on sites like these can be dangerous.
        • Wait a minimum of 7 days before placing the animal for adoption.
      • Once this has been completed you can then send us an email with the animals description then we will see if we are able to find a foster home to be able to take the animal in to the rescue. Please include in your email the potential age, sex, breeds, temperament, size and anything else that may be relevant.
      • Take precautions when bringing a new animal into the household:
        • All other animals should have no contact with the new arrival. Your other dogs may be at risk of contracting potential diseases or parasites from the new addition.
        • Walk the new dog in an area where your other dog(s) do not usually have access to, to prevent the possible transmission of parasties or diseases like Parvo Virus.
        • Ideally you should bring the new arrival to the veterinary office as soon as possible. The following is recommend with dogs comming from outside; Heartworm test, Flea treatment and prevention, De-worming, along with vaccines and sterilization. You can ask the veterinary to sex the animal, in females they can look for a scar to see if she may be spayed and males for the presence of testicles.
        • New arrivals should be quarantined for a minimum of 14 days before introducing to the house hold.
        • If you have other dogs the introduction is best done is a neutral area ex fenced in park down the road. You want to make sure the first introduction is positive to prevent the possible out break of a fight. Neutral areas are good as it removes the potential of a territory dispute, while having many other distractions to prevent the escalations of interest intensity and again possible fight.
        • If you have kids or cats, introduce slowly and keep a very good eye on all the interactions. Never let your guards down, even for the first few weeks. The new addition and kids, others dogs or other house hold pets should never be left unsupervised for any period of time for the first few weeks.

You have feral cat population you know of or have been feeding and would like to know what to do

      • What is a feral cat or population? They are the offspring of house pets and stray cats as a consequence of peoples the failure to sterilize their pets. They have been born, and raise outside some for many generations. They have never had human contact, and will likely be very fearful of you and will not approach.
      • What is the difference between a stray cat and a feral cat? Stray cats had a home and some point and were then dumped, they have kept their sociability towards humans and will usually approach with little to no hesitation.
      • Although feeding the cats is a compassionate thing to do for them. Feeding populations without making any effort to sterilize or seek assistance to do so only worsens the problem at hand. When you feed populations you are allowing the mother to breed more often, more successfully, and have larger litters with a high survival rate. Small populations can quickly escalate to the hundreds with in only a few years if nothing is done.
      • Please send us an email and include details about the populations like; Number of adults, kittens, ages of kittens, number of breeding mothers, location of population, history of diseases (Upper respiratory infections), or anything else you think we should know.

You have a found an animal that appears to be hurt or sick

    • Please refrain from bringing the animal to the local municipal pound as most will immediately euthanize the animal, or hold the animal untreated for a few days until their time is up.
    • If the animal is seriously injured seek your local veterinarian as soon as possible or send us an email with a description of the animal; Size, age, location you found it, what signs it is showing that makes you think it is hurt, and anything else you think is relevant.